PHY 110 Physics For Scientists and Engineers

Fall 2017

TWRF 11:00 – 11:50, MLT 208

Instructor:     Dr. George Rutherford                   e-mail           MLT 308-A           438-2934

Text:              Physics for Scientists and Engineers, 9th edition, by Serway and Jewett, published by Brooks/Cole Cengage Learning.

Note: While you are not required to purchase the hard-copy of the text, you are required to have electronic access (which includes electronic access to the full text) in order to do the online homework problems. A good compromise might be the publisher’s “hybrid” version, which includes full electronic access and a paperback version of the text (this limited version of the text does not include the end-of-chapter problems, but they are included in the electronic access). Be sure you purchase "Multi-Term" access if you plan to take PHY 111 and/or PHY 112 in following semesters.     The multi-term electronic access is ISBN 9781285858401

WebAssign Class Key is   ilstu 3835 2751     

Here is a video with instructions for enrollment in WebAssign. Use the class key above to enroll yourself in the WebAssign part of the course.

Here is a link to the User's Guide for Students.

Labs:             

Section Day and Time Room TA
2 Tues 1:00 - 3:50 MLT 217 Zach Temple
3 Tues 6:00 - 8:50 MLT 217 Andrew Eggers
5 Wed 12:00 - 2:50 MLT 217 Dr. Bogue
6 Wed 6:00 - 8:50 MLT 217 Zach Temple

Laboratory Manual for PHY 110 is required and may be purchased at the usual bookstores.

Calculator: A scientific calculator is also required and should be brought to every class or lab meeting.

Course Objectives: This is the first of a three-semester sequence in a calculus-based treatment of fundamental physics topics. This first semester will cover topics in mechanics. The associated laboratory will focus on measurement, data analysis, and presentation skills. Upon successful completion of this course, you should:

Course Format: The course consists of lecture periods and laboratory sessions. Hour exams will occur during the lecture sessions indicated on the tentative schedule. Pop quizzes can occur at any time.

Grading: Your performance will be assessed in a number of ways. There will be three hour-long exams and a comprehensive final exam, several pop-quizzes, electronic homework problems and lab reports. These components will be combined with the following weights to determine your final course grade:

Exams (3 x 10% each)
30%
Pop Quizzes (drop lowest)
15%
Electronic Homework (drop lowest)
15%
Lab Reports (drop lowest)
20%
Final Exam
20%
Total
100%

Letter grades are typically determined by: A: 90%, B = 80 to 89%, C = 70 to 79%, D = 60 to 69%, and F: 59% or below. A curve is possible but not guaranteed. Class behavior and participation can influence letter grades awarded for course averages near the numerical boundaries between letter grades. In addition, your course grade can be reduced even further for rude or disruptive behavior, chronic late arrival to class, use of mobile electronic devices in class, or similar behavior. Cheating or plagiarism is considered grounds for failure in the course.

Quizzes and exams can be a combination of multiple choice, short answer, or show-your-work problems, and they can cover any topic in the text (whether we discuss it in class or not), lectures, or lab. Since one pop quiz grade, one electronic homework grade, and one lab report grade will be dropped before your course average is calculated, no make-ups are allowed in those categories. A make-up or rescheduled exam may be possible in rare cases with sufficiently good reason (sickness, death in the immediate family, official university absence, etc.).

General Advice: The following is a collection of general advice gleaned from more than twenty years of teaching physics.

The following is a tentative schedule of the topics we’ll cover, lab assignments, and exam dates, etc. Remember that it is tentative and subject to change at my discretion.

22-Aug
Intro to class; Scientific notation; uncertainty; dimensional analysis Lab 0: Intro to Mathematica
23-Aug
Unit conversion; 1-d motion

 

   Free online Mathematica training

24-Aug
Calculus refresher   A Graphing Notebook
25-Aug
More 1-d motion

  Some Test Data

 
   
29-Aug
1-d motion problems and graphs Lab 1:  Making and using graphs
30-Aug
Vectors 1D Motion Problems
31-Aug
Problems and demonstrations Easy Projectile Problems
1-Sep
2-d motion; projectile motion Quiz 1 Solution
 
   
5-Sep
More projectile motion; uniform circular motion Lab 0.1 More Mathematica
6-Sep
General curvilinear motion; relative motion  
7-Sep
Problems and demonstrations   TestData2.txt
8-Sep
Laws of motion Quiz 2 Solution
 
   
12-Sep
Laws of motion, cont'd. Lab 2:  Intro to DataStudio
13-Sep
Friction  
14-Sep
Problems and demonstrations Practice Exam 1
15-Sep
Circular motion Quiz 3 Solution
 
   
19-Sep
Resistive forces  
20-Sep
Scalar product; Work  
21-Sep
Problems and demonstrations  
22-Sep
EXAM 1:  Chapters 1 - 5  
 
   
26-Sep
Work-energy theorem Lab 3:  Freefall
27-Sep
Potential energy and conservative forces Linear Regression Formulas
28-Sep
Problems and demonstrations  
29-Sep
More energy problems  
 
   
3-Oct
Conservation of energy Lab 4:  Projectile Motion
4-Oct
Problems using conservation of energy  
5-Oct
Problems and demonstrations  
6-Oct
Linear momentum; intro to collisions  
 
   
10-Oct
2-d collisions Lab 5:  Newton's Second Law
11-Oct
Center of mass  
12-Oct
Problems and demonstrations  
13-Oct
Angular variables and kinematics  
 
   
17-Oct
Torque and kinetics and moment of inertia Lab 6:  Conservation of Energy
18-Oct
Continued Revised Lab 6 Instructions
19-Oct
Problems and demonstrations  
20-Oct
Conservation of energy in rotation; rolling motion  
 
   
24-Oct
Vector cross product Practice Exam 2
25-Oct
Conservation of angular momentum Practice Chapter 10 Quiz
26-Oct
Problems and demonstrations  
27-Oct
EXAM 2:  Chapters 6 - 10  
 
   
31-Oct
Statics, continued Lab 7:  Ballistic Pendulum
1-Nov
Statics problems Wheel Suspension diagram
2-Nov
Review of Chapters 13 and 14  
3-Nov
Oscillatory motion; mass on a spring  
 
   
7-Nov
Simple harmonic motion; add energy  
8-Nov
Pendulum; damped and forced oscillation  
9-Nov
Problems and demonstrations  
10-Nov
Motion of a disturbance; traveling pulses  
 
   
14-Nov
Traveling harmonic waves Lab 8:  Simple Harmonic Motion
15-Nov
Sound waves; pressure variation  
16-Nov
Problems and demonstrations  
17-Nov
Intensity and sound level  
 
   
21-Nov
Thanksgiving Holiday  
22-Nov
   
23-Nov
  Practice Exam 3
24-Nov
   
 
   
28-Nov
Doppler effect  
29-Nov
Superposition and interference  
30-Nov
Problems and demonstrations  
1-Dec
EXAM 3:  Chapters 11–12, 15–16  
 
   
5-Dec
Standing waves Lab 9:  Standing Waves
6-Dec
Continued  
7-Dec
Problems and demonstrations Practice Final Exam
8-Dec
Review and catch-up  

 

The final examination date and time will be announced later.